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January 12, 2006

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» Respect, Power and the Personal Domain from Talk Politics
Chris is right on the money in his observations on Blair's 'Respect Agenda' in noting that: What people in deprived areas are deprived of is not (merely) money; in any historic or global perspective, the average tenant in such areas is amazingly pro... [Read More]

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jamie

Well I used to see kids skiving from my stepson's school most days when he was there, and I was quite happy with it. If they didn't want to be there, I thought it was preferable that they absent themselves rather than be present and disuptive for kids who were willing to learn.

This isn't to say that skiving is a good thing, but it can be preferable under specific circumstances. Perhaps other people make that judgement as well.

david

The weakness here is the assumption that the rich don't behave badly. They do, they just don't face much punishment for it, and they have more space to do it in.

Marcin Tustin

It's like your some kind of commie, wanting to give the lower orders a say in how things are run. If they can't run their own puny lives, how can you expect them to run anything else. With attitudes like that, you'll never get on in the New Labourist State, except perhaps to summary social rehabilitation, once a social worker, policeman, or council clerk notices your asocial beliefs and actions.

Marcin Tustin

(I did, of course mean to type "you're", not "your".)

mynewsbot

Democracy rules the best

Robert Schwartz

It is a fundamentally different version of life than the statist model Britain has adopted. What you need is a stronger civil society and a devolved government. Then men are able to participate in their own lives.

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