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September 25, 2006

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Alex

Again, though, this assumes effectively perfect substitution - you could just change jobs and not commute. And a pony. If the cost of avoidance is high enough, you cross the bar from choice to duress.

James

Someone might not choose to commute e.g. the Peugeot site in Coventry closes and someone who was working there now finds that the nearest place they can find a job in the car manufacturing industry is Oxford. Ideally they would move to where the job is but they have kids in school and their significant other works locally so they end up commuting.

james

...This, they say, might be because people fail to anticipate their future tastes - they fail to foresee that they'll get used to higher pay and better jobs, but not get used to the hassle of commuting...

Part of the want-to-have-the-cake-and-to-eat it as well syndrome. It's also part of the reverse-gucci syndrome when long after the quality is forgotten, the cost remains.

By the way, I think there's someone masquerading as me calling himself James.

james

...This, they say, might be because people fail to anticipate their future tastes - they fail to foresee that they'll get used to higher pay and better jobs, but not get used to the hassle of commuting...

Part of the want-to-have-the-cake-and-to-eat it as well syndrome. It's also part of the reverse-gucci syndrome when long after the quality is forgotten, the cost remains.

By the way, I think there's someone masquerading as me calling himself James.

James

Or alternatively someone else whose first name is James.

Pete in Dunbar

But one of you is James, the other is james. Unless you're a windows pc these are quite different.

I used to spend on average two hours a day driving to and from work (including the horrors of the Edinburgh City Bypass and the Forth Road Bridge). In my case this was through imperfect market knowledge - having accepted the job and handed in my notice, it turned out to be a) a lot harder to sell my house in England and b) because of that hard to find anywhere that I could afford in Scotland where I would want to live.

Moving nearer to work certainly improved my well-being. Actually, since I save on 18,000 miles of driving and the bridge toll, I'm actually about £2,000 a year better off.

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