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March 07, 2008

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james c

You do love your non-sequitors, don't you.


ad

There is no secret to "long term success". If you wait long enough, every company fails.

Gerard O'Neill

Chris, are you not missing the blindingly obvious point that the only real 'monopoly' being exploited in your delightful conspiracy story was that of the NHS? When you have a monopoly buyer then guess what: you have EVERY incentive to make sure you are the preferred seller. Sure beats dealing with a bunch of fickle consumers any day.

So your advice to shareholders should be to buy stock in companies well established with monopoly (state) buyers. Arms manufacturers come to mind.

chris

Gerard - supplying to the state is by no means a licence to print money. Isoft and Jarvis, to name but two, have got into a terrible pickle in recent years.

Roger Thornhill

The best (only?) way to ensure a monopoly is to "secure"* the connivance of the State**.

Without the State** to enforce a monopoly via law or a defacto one via subsidy or purchasing decisions, companies are indeed a bid away from losing the deal. Ergo the issue is not the corporation but the State. The less the State buys, does or controls, the smaller the ground available for corporations to wangle monopolies.

Answer- shrink the state and stop it spending our money by cutting it at the source - taxation.


* buy, bribe, entertain, wine, dine or otherwise offer incentives to

** especially individuals in office or self-interested political factions.

mls

There is no secret to "long term success". If you wait long enough, every company fails. just have a look on it guys.
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Shane

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