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February 01, 2011

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Nigel

completely agree --- Oakeshott is very good on that too - how politics has to work with practice, culture and tradition, and is not something you can just rationally work out from first principles

Neil

There's a Sun headline in there somewhere... HOES CAUSE HIGHER BIRTH RATES

I'll get my coat.

alanm

Over the iron cage of determinism i'll take the unfulfilled potential and dashed hopes of makng my own bed.

BenSix

Hey, I'm a self-made man! I just used other people's materials, tools, designs, instructions...

Jackart

That "no man is an island, entire of himself", does not mean that a man is simply a creation of his culture and history. Whilst some libertarians ascribe too much agency to the individual, you ascribe too little. Is it not a counsel of dispair to suggest that man cannot break the bonds of his upbringing? Research such as this generates the knowledge by which individuals can break those bonds.

Tom Addison

Hmmm, would love to know what the root cause of the shiteness of the England national team is then. As any reader of a Jonathan Wilson book/article will know, it's been around for a while. As Brian Glanville said:

“The story of British football and the foreign challenge is the story of a vast superiority, sacrificed by stupidity, short-sightedness, and wanton insularity. It is a story of shamefully wasted talent, extraordinary complacency and infinite self-deception.”

I blame 1066.

chris

@ Tom: I've blamed class divisions:
http://stumblingandmumbling.typepad.com/stumbling_and_mumbling/2010/06/class-and-football.html
It could well be that the UK's early industrialization - which entrenched a boss-worker divide - is bad for English football.

Paul Sagar

"This, they say, is because child labour is of less use to plough-based agriculture than it is to hoe-based farming - and this different economic incentive to have children shaped cultural norms which persist long after society has moved away from agriculture."

Yeah, right.

Laura

We are creatures of the society we grow up in and also result of the family that has brought us up and of our own convictions. We are not self-made people but we are not totally "constructed" by external factors.

Tom Addison

Thanks for that Chris, I'll definitely give that a read tonight and see if I can write something on it over the weekend for the blog. Much appreciated.

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